The Nice Guys (2016)

The Nice Guys is a 2016 action-comedy film directed by Shane Black and starring Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling. The film is set in 1970s Los Angeles and follows the unlikely partnership of a tough enforcer, Jackson Healy (Crowe), and a bumbling private investigator, Holland March (Gosling), as they investigate a conspiracy involving a missing girl and the porn industry. Let’s consider the pros and cons of The Nice Guys…

Pros: The Nice Guys is a hilarious and action-packed film that boasts excellent performances from both Crowe and Gosling. The chemistry between the two leads is electric, and their banter and physical comedy are a joy to watch. The film also features a strong supporting cast, including Angourie Rice as March’s daughter, who adds heart and depth to the story. Additionally, the film’s setting and soundtrack capture the feel of 1970s Los Angeles perfectly, adding to the film’s charm and authenticity. The Nice Guys is a great example of a genre-bending film that successfully blends humor, action, and mystery into a unique and entertaining package.

Cons: While The Nice Guys is a highly enjoyable film, it does have some minor flaws. The plot can be somewhat convoluted at times, and some of the supporting characters feel underdeveloped. Additionally, the film’s humor may not be for everyone, as it often relies on crude jokes and slapstick humor. Finally, some viewers may find the film’s violence and profanity to be excessive or unnecessary.

I give The Nice Guys a solid A! It’s a hilarious and exciting film that is sure to delight fans of action-comedies. With excellent performances from its leads and a sharp script, the film stands out as one of the best of its genre. While it may not be perfect, it’s definitely worth a watch for anyone looking for a fun and entertaining movie.

GRADE:

A

Rating: 4.5 out of 5.

Pros/Cons

  • Acting
  • Soundtrack
  • Profanity

Where to Watch

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